Although Drinking Alcohol Has Been Linked To 11 Different Types Of Cancer, Coffee Appears To Offer Some Protection

Although Drinking Alcohol Has Been Linked To 11 Different Types Of Cancer, Coffee Appears To Offer Some Protection

According to new research, drinking alcohol increases a person’s risk of nearly a dozen different types of cancer. However, drinking a different sort of beverage may protect you from some of them.

Researchers from Imperial College London discovered that drinking alcohol is a major risk factor for various cancers, including breast, CRC [colorectal cancer], esophageal, head and neck, and liver cancer, in a study published in Nature Communications.

Drinking Alcohol Has Been Linked To 11 Different Types Of Cancer, Coffee Appears To Offer Some Protection

The study did find, however, that drinking at least one cup of regular or decaffeinated coffee each day could work very well and protects against liver cancer and skin basal cell carcinoma. This study was participated by various users out of which some consume alcohol while some others prefer coffee and some go for both. The research has come with this interesting fact that coffee can help one improve the overall medical condition which may be damaged by the use of liquor.

Furthermore, eating dairy and multigrain foods may reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer, according to studies. To investigate the link between cancer and other nutrients, the researchers went through data from 860 reviews of published studies. This research again proves the utility of milk, coffee, and other dairy products for the betterment of human health in the general context. Those who can switch can save their body.

Although Drinking Alcohol Has Been Linked To 11 Different Types Of Cancer, Coffee Appears To Offer Some Protection

According to Mexico’s National Survey on Drug, Tobacco, and Alcohol Use, over four out of ten adults have drunk alcohol in the previous month, and nearly two out of ten have consumed alcohol in an excessive manner. Furthermore, problematic alcohol use is one of the five major risk factors for non-communicable diseases, which account for the vast majority of fatalities worldwide each year.

The expert spoke during the opening of the ninth Alcoholics Anonymous Convention, which was held in Tuxtla Gutiérrez and attended by community members from many states and nations.

“The discovery of this new study should be obedient to a public health warning: harmful alcohol intake must be diminished or avoided, and alcohol-control measures must be accepted in each country to preserve public health. There are rules in some nations, but the alcohol business does not follow them,” the Champagne expert emphasized.

According to the researchers, “we discovered extremely suggestive evidence that coffee consumption was inversely linked with the risk of liver and skin basal cell carcinoma.” “Coffee’s health benefits could be attributed to the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory qualities of its phytochemical constituents, which may protect against diseases caused by inflammation, such as cancer.”

“The assessment confirms the evidence we have for alcohol and coffee in relation to cancer and cancer subtypes,” according to GiotaMitrou, director of research and innovation at the World Cancer Research Fund, which funded the study.

According to the researchers, drinking at least one cup of regular or decaffeinated coffee may protect against liver cancer, while eating dairy and multigrain meals may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.

According to The Guardian, GiotaMitrou, the director of research and innovation at the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF), said, “This umbrella review validates the data we have for alcohol and coffee in relation to cancer.”

“More research is needed to better understand the processes underlying the links between coffee and cancer, as well as the links between alcohol and different cancer subtypes,” Mitrou, whose organization financed the study, noted. He did add, though, that more research is required. “More research is needed to better understand the processes underlying the linkages between coffee and cancer, as well as the links between alcohol and many other cancer subtypes,” Mitrou added.